GUI ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Growing Up in Ireland Annual Research Conference 2022

The fourteenth annual Growing Up in Ireland Research Conference was held online on Wednesday, 25th May 2022. The conference was opened by Minister Roderic O’Gorman TD.

 

The programme included the launch of the latest GUI ReportResearch Needs for Cohort ’98 at age 25, presented by Dr Aisling Murray (ESRI).

 

The keynote address was given by Professor Alissa Goodman (UCL) on the topic of Inequalities in the early years, and opportunities and challenges setting up two new national birth cohort studies in the UK

The DCEDIY-awarded prize for the best paper with a policy focus was won by Keyu Ye, Eamonn Carroll and Selina McCoy for their presentation, Educationally maintained inequality? The role of risk factors and resilience at 9, 13 and 17 in disabled young people’s post-school pathways at 20.

2022 Conference Presentations

The conference included presentations based on the Growing Up in Ireland study data from a range of researchers. The full list of presentations (with links to slides/videos where permitted) can be found below.

The conference programme and book of abstracts are also available to download.

– Post-school expectations and outcomes among migrant-origin young people in Ireland (video) – Frances McGinnity, ESRI

– Educationally maintained inequality? The role of risk factors and resilience at 9, 13 and 17 in disabled young people’s post-school pathways at 20 (video) – Keyu Ye and Eamonn Carroll, ESRI

– Early digital exposure and later digital skills: evidence from home and school environments in Ireland – Míde Griffin, ESRI

Who chooses science? Subject take-up in the Growing Up in Ireland study (video)– Carmel Hannan, UL

Do children in multi-grade classes in small schools do well in mathematics? – Breed Murphy, MIE

– A longitudinal investigation of personality and internet behaviours of young people who meet online contacts face-to-face – Gretta Mohan, ESRI

– Consequences of victimization among Irish adolescents: a longitudinal cohort study – Giulio D’Urso, UCD